Two of Delmarva’s Most Respected Health Systems Form HealthPartners Delmarva

Peninsula Regional CEO/President Peggy Naleppa, left, and Bayhealth CEO/President Terry Murphy sign the agreement creating HealthPartners Delmarva on July 29, 2014.

Peninsula Regional CEO/President Peggy Naleppa, left, and Bayhealth CEO/President Terry Murphy sign the agreement creating HealthPartners Delmarva on July 29, 2014.

Two of the leading and most comprehensive healthcare systems on the Delmarva Peninsula today announced that they have joined together to form an interstate partnership to improve the overall healthcare experience for all Delmarva residents.

Bayhealth of Dover, Delaware, with hospitals in Dover and Milford, and Peninsula Regional Health System of Salisbury, Maryland, which operates Peninsula Regional Medical Center (PRMC), have formed HealthPartners Delmarva. The collaboration allows each hospital to share the best practices of both organizations, but is not a financial purchase of one health system by the other. The partnership is focused on collaborating to improve patient care and access and is not a consolidation of workforces.

HealthPartners Delmarva was developed and approved by the Boards of each health system to better implement the healthcare Triple Aim of improving the experience for the patient, improving the health of our communities and creating a way for people to obtain those services in the most affordable setting.

“Creating the best experience for our patients will mean identifying and adopting best practices that focus on convenience, safety, time and cost efficiency,” said Terry Murphy, Bayhealth’s President and CEO. “By bringing together the experience, innovation and patient-centered values of our two health systems, we can be even more prepared for the new realities of healthcare.”

Dr. Peggy Naleppa, President and CEO of PRMC said, “Similar-minded health systems like Bayhealth and Peninsula Regional Health System, which have similar patient-first values, are establishing what the future of healthcare will look like on the Delmarva Peninsula. Together we have as our goal to provide patients greater access to best-in-class healthcare and to leverage for the benefit of our patients the combined intellectual assets of each health system.”

HealthPartners Delmarva will identify new opportunities to improve outcomes and innovative ways to share services while reducing expenses. The alliance is focused on designing tools and processes for clinical improvement using the shared knowledge of both organizations. It will also bring together community providers to enhance integrated care that focuses on the health of the community as a whole.

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Peninsula Regional Medical Center Named Among 100 U.S. Hospitals With Great Oncology Programs

The Richard. A Henson Cancer Institute at Peninsula Regional Medical Center takes a team approach to care.

The Richard. A Henson Cancer Institute at Peninsula Regional Medical Center takes a team approach to care.

We were proud to learn today that Becker’s Hospital Review has named Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury and its Richard A. Henson Cancer Institute among “100 Hospitals and Health Systems With Great Oncology Programs.”

The 100 hospitals were chosen for being on the cutting edge of cancer treatment, prevention and research, and the Becker’s Hospital Review editorial team selected them based on clinical accolades, quality of care and contributions to the field of oncology. Peninsula Regional was one of just four hospitals recognized in Maryland, and the only on the Eastern Shore. The complete list can be found here.

Becker’s says that organizations on this year’s list “are leading the way in terms of quality patient care, cancer outcomes and research.”

The Richard A. Henson Cancer Institute at Peninsula Regional Medical Center is nationally accredited and recognized for its performance and outcomes, and is the recipient of the 2011 Outstanding Achievement Award from the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer. The program, Delmarva’s largest and featuring the region’s most experienced team, offers complete cancer treatment with an emphasis on advanced medicine and technology, comprehensive services and compassionate care.

The Becker’s Hospital Review editorial team selected hospitals for inclusion based on rankings and awards they have received from a variety of reputable sources. The following awards were considered as part of the criteria for inclusion on the list: U.S. News & World Report cancer rankings, Truven Health Analytics, CareChex cancer care rankings, National Cancer Institute designations, the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer accreditations, American Nurses Credentialing Center designations, and awards and Blue Distinction Center recognition from the BlueCross BlueShield Association.

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August 2014 Classes and Events at Peninsula Regional

Peninsula Regional has many opportunities for healthy education, screenings and support coming up in August – here are the full listings:

Tuesday, August 5

Stroke Support Group. 1-3 p.m. Free. Hallowell Conference Center, Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury. People who have experienced strokes, and their caregivers, gather for education and support. Valet parking is available at the Frank B. Hanna Outpatient Entrance. Call 410-912-7961for information.

Wednesday, August 6

Survivor Support Group. Cancer Support Services Office, Salisbury. 5:30-7 p.m. Cancer survivors and patients meet to learn and share experiences. Call 410-546-1200.

Caregiver Support Group. Cancer Support Services Office, Salisbury. 5:30-7 p.m. The caregivers of those going through cancer meet for mutual support and education. Call 410-546-1200.

Friday, August 8

Safe Sitter Class. 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. $50. Avery W. Hall Educational Center, Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury. Safe Sitter is a medically accurate one-day course that teaches young men and women ages 11-14 how to handle emergencies when caring for young children. Maryland law states that you must be 13 years of age to babysit. Safe Sitters learn basic life-saving techniques, safety precautions to prevent accidents, how and when to summon help, and tips on basic child care. Visit the Classes and Events section of http://www.peninsula.org or call 410- 543-7126 for information on how to register.

ALS Support Group. Avery W. Hall Educational Center CQI-2 Room, Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury. 1-3 p.m. Free. The ALS Support Group meets on the second Friday of the month. People with ALS and their caregivers are welcome to come and share information and experiences. For information, call 410-543-7069.

Tuesday, August 12

Coastal Cardiovascular Check. Wagner Wellness Van, Hocker’s Super Center, Clarksville, Delaware. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Free. Peninsula Regional Medical Center professionals will perform screenings that include blood pressure, grip strength, body mass index and body fat measurements. Screenings are open to men and women age 18 and older; no pre-registration is required. For information, call the Guerrieri Heart & Vascular Institute’s Cardiovascular/Pulmonary Rehabilitation Department at 410-543-7026.

Wednesday, August 13

Better Breather’s Club. 1:30-2:30 p.m. Avery W. Hall Educational Center, Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury. The Better Breathers Club is a free support group for adults who suffer from asthma, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, lung cancer and other respiratory problems. Monthly meetings feature educational presentations on a wide range of relevant topics, video presentations and roundtable discussions. Group members share their experiences, knowledge, ideas and strengths to improve the quality of their lives. Family members and caregivers are also welcome to attend. Call 410-546-6400 ext. 3724.

Survivor/Patient Support Group. Cancer Support Services Office, Salisbury. 5:30-7 p.m. Cancer survivors and patients meet to learn and share experiences. Call 410-546-1200.

Monday, August 18

Insulin Pump Club. Avery W. Hall Educational Center, Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury. 7 to 8 p.m. Free. The PRMC Diabetes Education Program holds this free quarterly support program featuring educational information and experience sharing for anyone who uses or is interested in using an insulin pump. Call 410-543-7061 for information.

Tuesday, August 19

Breastfeeding Class. 6-8 p.m. $30. Avery W. Hall Education Center Auditorium, Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury. Learn the basics of breastfeeding, proper positioning of baby, how to avoid common problems, and how to pump and store milk. Mothers are encouraged to bring support members with them. Pre-registration is required; call 410-543-7512, or visit the Classes and Events section of www.peninsula.org.

Head & Neck Cancer Support Group. Cancer Support Services Office, Riverside Drive, Salisbury. 5:30-7 p.m. Survivors and patients with head and neck cancer meet to learn and share experiences. Call 410-546-1200.

Wednesday, August 20

Diabetes Education Class. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury. This five-week course meets on consecutive Wednesdays through Sept. 17. Staff includes nurses, dietitians and Certified Diabetes Educators who help participants set goals to improve their diabetes management and learn strategies for a healthier lifestyle. Registration is required; call the Diabetes Education Program at Peninsula Regional at 410-543-7061.

Survivor/Patient Support Group. Cancer Support Services Office, 560 Riverside Drive, Salisbury. 5:30-7 p.m. Cancer survivors and patients meet to learn and share experiences. Call 410-546-1200.

Caregiver Support Group. Cancer Support Services Office, 560 Riverside Drive, Salisbury. 5:30-7 p.m. The caregivers of those going through cancer meet for mutual support and education. Call 410-546-1200.

Thursday, August 21

Diabetes Education Class. 1-3 p.m. Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury. This five-week course meets on consecutive Thursdays through Dec. 19 (no meeting on Thanksgiving). A nurse and registered dietitian, both certified diabetes instructors, teach nutrition, foot care, glucose monitoring, exercise and other self-management skills. Registration is required; call the Diabetes Education Program at Peninsula Regional at 410-543-7061.

Wednesday, August 27

Caregiver Support Group. Cancer Support Services Office, 560 Riverside Drive, Salisbury. 5:30-7 p.m. The caregivers of those going through cancer meet for mutual support and education. Call 410-546-1200.

 

 

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PRMC’s Insulin Pump Club Meets August 18

Insulin pumps have been in the news lately thanks to a beauty pageant contestant who fearlessly wore hers on her bikini during the Miss Idaho competition (which she won). If you wear a pump or are interested in learning about them, the Peninsula Regional Medical Center Diabetes Education Program’s next Insulin Pump Club meeting is scheduled from 7:00 to 8:00 p.m. on Monday, August 18, 2014 in the CQI-2 conference room in the Avery W. Hall Educational Center on the Peninsula Regional campus.

New technology, pump management techniques and lifestyle issues are presented and discussed by diabetes care professionals. This is an excellent opportunity for all participants to share beneficial ideas and life experiences. This is a free support program, so there are no dues or fees to attend. The Insulin Pump Club will also meet in November.

If you have any questions about the Insulin Pump Club or would like additional information on any of the other club dates, please call the Diabetes Education Program at Peninsula Regional at 410-543-7061.

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Independent Q&A With Peggy Naleppa

Recently, the Salisbury Independent (a recently launched weekly newspaper) published a Q&A by editor Greg Bassett with Peninsula Regional Medical Center President/CEO Peggy Naleppa. You can pick up the paper at various locations around town. Visit the site, or read the Q&A below.

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Dr. Peggy Naleppa may very well have the most challenging job in Wicomico County. As the leader of Peninsula Regional Medical Center, out of 48 hospitals in the state, she runs Maryland’s ninth-largest with 288 acute care beds, 28 newborn beds and nearly 1 million square feet of space.

Approximately 3,400 staff, credentialed physicians and volunteers are caring for more than a half-million patients each year at PRMC, and within the Peninsula Regional Medical Group of family medicine and specialty care offices.

The medical center itself, with about 2,900 employees, is Wicomico County’s largest single-site employer. Annually, it infuses right around $375 million back into our local economy based on its nearly $500 million operation.

After a stint serving as Chief Operating Officer under predecessor Alan Newberry, Naleppa was named PRMC’s president in January 2008 and CEO in 2010. She began her health care career, now stretching across four decades, as director of Neurosurgical Services at George Washington University Medical Center in Washington, D.C. She has served as a clinical leader or as a senior executive at several hospitals in Maryland including: Anne Arundel Medical Center, Calvert Memorial Hospital and St. Mary’s Hospital.

Naleppa, who is a registered nurse, holds a bachelor’s in Healthcare Administration from St. Joseph’s College; a Master of Administration degree with a concentration in Finance from the University of Maryland UC; an MBA, with a concentration in medical services from the Johns Hopkins University Carey School of Business and a Doctorate in Management with a concentration in organizational process management from the University of Maryland UC.

Q. Do you indeed have the most challenging job in Wicomico County?

A. I’m not sure it’s the most challenging but it’s certainly the most rewarding.

Q. Employee performance and quality care seem to be the hallmarks that you stress. Which is more important? People? Technology? Infrastructure?

A. In health care, each is important to providing our community an exceptional visit with the best possible outcome. However, it’s the people who are the engine that powers PRMC.

The health care experience begins and ends with the human element and the human touch, and in such a complex organization as ours we can never forget that.

It’s things like surgical robots, 64 slice CT scanners, precision cancer treatments that get the headlines, but at the end of the day it’s the person who brought you a warm blanket when you were cold that you’ll remember most.

And those are the stories you’ll share.

We believe that it’s “every person, every patient, every time” at PRMC, and we can make that experience exceptional by treating everyone who comes through our door as one of our most beloved relatives.

Q. One might think there are a lot of big egos in a medical center setting? What is it like interacting on a constant basis with a workforce comprised of people who are just so darn smart?

A. It’s an honor, because I have the opportunity to learn something new every day and that’s inspiring.

Around egos, we do our level best to remind everyone that if they have one, they need to check it at the door. And if they can’t, then perhaps they need to find another place to practice their craft.

Let’s also be clear, Greg, that we’re not confusing ego with confidence. We want confident employees who are contributing by sharing fresh and innovative ideas to be more effective, efficient, to reduce waste and to improve the patient and family experience.

Much like competitive rowing, health care is a team sport; only our gold medal is achieved when people leave here healthy. If we aren’t all in sync, all pulling together without variation, standardizing the work and celebrating the victories, we fail as a team.

Variation is the enemy of quality. There’s no room for big egos in that boat.

Q. You went through a recent workforce consolidation that was very tough. Where is the medical center today?

A. I believe this year has been the most challenging for our employees – emotions have been high as we saw folks exit the organization and/or retire. Unanticipated volume increases did not match staffing needs and we could not respond fast enough with staff.

This past week in orientation we had 57 new clinicians joining our team and similar numbers in two weeks.

Our No. 1 goal this year is operational stability including enhancing our Flex Pool staff in key disciplines to quickly adjust for changes in volume, reducing length of stay and other conditions that create variation.

The new reimbursement model in Maryland should help support our financial condition and we are cautiously optimistic.

Q. And you, personally?

A. I’m energized, and come to work each day to do the very best job possible for our patients and our healthcare team. I choose to believe in PRMC, its physicians, employees — it’s real and from the heart.

We are not perfect, but we focus on our value system, and I take great pride when I read a complimentary letter of how our employees save lives, hold a hand, and make a positive difference in a person’s life. They are my true professional heroes.

And, when we don’t see these behaviors — we work as leaders to address the need to change these behaviors.

Q. What is it about PRMC that most local people either just don’t know or understand or appreciate?

A. I believe it’s just how complex we are, how talented our healthcare team is and the number of world-class physicians we have practicing medicine here.

It’s been said to me that if you took a giant crane, plucked a hospital-right now-from any urban, metropolitan city and dropped it in Salisbury, Maryland, that would best describe PRMC. We’ve certainly come a long way from a very, very humble beginning as a six-bed hospital in a home on Fitzwater Street in 1897.

The services we offer rival those of major teaching institutions across the country.

Our team, led by some amazing surgeons, pioneered open heart surgery, neurosurgery, joint replacement surgery and brought revolutionary technology like robotics and minimally invasive surgery to this community.

There are hospitals that are just now launching Electronic Medical Recordkeeping-we introduced ours in the mid 1970’s. And for the first time in the history of our hospital, we recently experienced a full month with no code blues on our medical/surgical floors.

That’s revolutionary and proves that programs like our Modified Early Warning System to detect changes in patient conditions much earlier-even before they show any signs on the outside of becoming sicker-are working and preventing costly visits to our ICU.

Most importantly, they are saving lives. We have provided exceptional health care for the past 116 years and we will provide exceptional health care for generations to come.

Q. What do folks not know about you?

A. Away from PRMC, our core circle of friends is small – we have all been together more than 35 years.

We recently lost one of our best friends — Denis Reen – a teacher at the Maryland School for Deaf. Denis raised five kids on a single income. A Marine corporal and Vietnam veteran, he was selected as a model for the 3-Servicemen Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial — in the statute he’s the man with ammo over his shoulder).

I encourage people to Google Marine “Denis Reen” and “model for Vietnam Memorial” to learn more.

He never took a penny, denied interviews and always stated when my kids would say ‘Uncle Denis that’s you up there’ – “I represent all veterans, and all it means is pigeons will (poop) on me forever.”

That’s the humble, down-to-earth type of guy Denis was.

Family and close friends are my top priorities. Along with my husband, Dan, and my family members, Denis and his wife, Kathleen, are my personal heroes.

Q. As a community leader who I’m sure has experienced a number of life lessons after four decades in the health care industry, is there still more to learn?

A. I am not a holier than thou person, nor do I claim to make perfect decisions, but I do try and learn from each situation how to be better and grow, to improve.

I can’t control opinions of me nor would I ever want to, but I can control how I respond to circumstances.

On my bedside stand is the Bible and Viktor Frankl’s book, “Man’s Search for Meaning” – no greater humbling experience.

As a physician and Holocaust survivor, he describes his experience of six years at Auschwitz. He found many situations (as I do) that connect with angry, ego oriented, self- righteous and judgmental people.

His teachings show that we cannot change people, but we can change ourselves and how we respond to people.

Dr. Frankl had to find beauty in the fishbone in water the Nazi’s delivered to him in the form of a daily soup. It’s an amazing chronicle of the importance of a positive mindset and a WILL to see the good in all things.

I read sections from this book regularly. I chose in my own way to respond with Christian standards and those of others that I admire, like Frankl and Mother Theresa.

Q. People, I’m sure, without even knowing you, have preconceived ideas of you as a CEO of one of Salisbury’s biggest employers. Is this troublesome?

A. Only to the degree that they don’t know the entire Peggy Naleppa including wife, mother and grandmother — and that’s why opportunities like this Q&A in The Independent are so important.

While I enjoy new things, my husband of 42 years and I have worked very hard to achieve a standard of living – but we do not define who we are by materialistic items.

Everyone deserves same level of care and respect regardless of income or title. I have a low tolerance for disrespectful and arrogant behavior – I am adamant about the need to avoid being full of oneself and ego — edging God out — orientation. We are all created equal.

As CEO of a large health care system with a $500 million gross revenue budget, I know I am a target and critics will remain.

But, it’s America. Our servicemen and women fought for this right of speech and opinion, and in the end all people have to explain their behavior to their God, not to anyone else.

Mother Teresa offers great wisdom: Give the world the best you have, and it may never be enough, give the world the best you have anyway; People are often unreasonable, illogical and self-centered — forgive them anyway; the good you do today, people will often forget tomorrow — Be good anyway; You see in the final analysis — it’s between me and God, it is never between me and them.

I have this posted in my office.

Q. Great words to live by.

A. They really are, Greg. We should all be humble and give thanks much more often than we do.

Everyone has tragedies in life; I have had five major family tragedies personally and two recent attempted home invasions. And through each challenge, I have always felt blessed because I know who walks beside me.

We would all be better people if we just remembered that true nobility is not being better than someone else, it is being better than what you once were.

Greg Bassett is editor and general manager of Salisbury Independent.

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Peggy Naleppa Named One of Maryland’s Most Admired CEOs for 2014

Peggy Naleppa, MS, MBA, Dr.M, FACHE, President and CEO of Peninsula Regional Medical Center and the Peninsula Regional Health System, has been elected to the Maryland Hospital Association’s Executive Committee.

Peggy Naleppa, MS, MBA, Dr.M, FACHE, President and CEO of Peninsula Regional Medical Center and the Peninsula Regional Health System, has been elected to the Maryland Hospital Association’s Executive Committee.

Peninsula Regional Medical Center President/CEO Peggy Naleppa, MS, MBA, Dr.M, FACHE, was today named among Maryland’s 30 Most Admired CEOs for 2014. Dr. Naleppa was also a recipient of this award in 2012. She is one of just seven Maryland CEOs honored in the category of “Non-profits with More than $10 Million in Annual Revenue” and is the Eastern Shore’s lone recipient.

Created by The Daily Record, a Baltimore-based business newspaper, the award highlights some of the most notably talented CEOs leading the state’s nonprofit, for profit and public companies. 2014’s Most Admired CEOs were selected based on their demonstration of strong leadership, vision, competitiveness and innovation, community service, commitment to financial performance and excellence, growth, corporate leadership, board service and nonprofit involvement.

“Being named a Most Admired CEO takes more than in-depth knowledge about running a company or organization. It requires an extraordinary level of drive and ambition because it is a tremendously challenging job,” said Suzanne Fischer-Huettner, Publisher of The Daily Record. “They have learned the value of surrounding themselves with great team members, with leaders and employees who believe in the organization’s core values and mission.”

Peggy, who has served as PRMC’s President in 2008 and its CEO in January of 2010, is responsible for the leadership of Maryland’s 9th largest hospital-by bed count-with 275 licensed acute care beds and nearly 1,000,000 square feet of space on the Salisbury campus. Its annual system budget is close to $500 million.

“The culture of any organization starts at the top and reflects the leadership abilities of the CEO,” added William R. McCain, Chairman of the Peninsula Regional Medical Center Board of Trustees. “At PRMC, Dr. Naleppa’s strong organizational skills, work ethic and professionalism permeates throughout the institution as she challenges us all to always deliver exceptional care to every person, every patient, every time.”

Peggy began her healthcare career, now approaching four decades, as Director of Neurosurgical Services at George Washington University Medical Center in Washington, DC. She has served as a clinical leader or as a senior executive at several hospitals in Maryland including: Anne Arundel Medical Center, Calvert Memorial Hospital and St. Mary’s Hospital. She has served as President of the Maryland Chapter of the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA) and has held several leadership positions with the Maryland Hospital Association. She is also a Fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives.

Peggy, who is a registered nurse, holds a BS in Healthcare Administration from St. Joseph’s College; a Master of Administration degree with a concentration in Finance from the University of Maryland University College; an MBA, with a concentration in medical services from the Johns Hopkins University Carey School of Business and a Doctorate in Management with a concentration in organizational process management from the University of Maryland University College.

Peggy and the other 29 Most Admired CEOs of 2014 will be honored September 18 at a dinner starting at 5:30 p.m. at the BWI Hilton. Winners will be profiled in a special magazine that will be inserted into the September 19 issue of The Daily Record and available online at http://www.TheDailyRecord.com. Maryland CEOs can be nominated for this award every other year and may be recognized a total of three times.

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U.S. News & World Report Names PRMC a Best Regional Hospital

Peninsula Regional Medical Center (PRMC) is among the nation’s best hospitals for 2014-2015, and has been named a Best Regional Hospital on the Eastern Shore of Maryland according to U.S. News & World Report, the publisher of Best Hospitals.

“The data tell the story – a hospital that emerged from our analysis as one of the best has much to be proud of,” said U.S. News Health Rankings Editor Avery Comarow. “A Best Hospital has demonstrated its expertise in treating the most challenging patients.”

This is the fourth consecutive year that PRMC has been named a Best Regional Hospital in Maryland. U.S. News and World Report also previously named Peninsula Regional a Most Connected Hospital for its use of technology in support of patient care and patient safety. The Medical Center was also similarly recognized by the American Hospital Association as One of America’s Most Wired Hospitals for advancing the use of technology in patient care and safety.

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